Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

RedtailedBlackCockatooOther Names: Naso Cockatoo, Karrak
Scientific Name: Calyptorhynchus banksii
Conservation Status: Near Threatened
Body Length: 50–55 cm
Incubation: 28 days
Number of young: 1

Distribution: South-west Western Australia
Habitat: Wet Forests

Description: Male Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoos are black with two vibrant red stripes in the tail. They also have a very full crest and a black bill. Females are black but have yellow spots and yellow fringed feathers. The beak is a light grey and the tail has yellow to red stripes.

Diet: Red-tailed Black Cockatoos are omnivores and eat seeds, fruit, bulbs and insects.

In the wild: This species of Black Cockatoo only produces one young every second year, making it very difficult to increase the species’ numbers.

Threats: Forest Red-tailed Cockatoos have a very low rate of reproduction which means the population cannot quickly replace the large number of birds that have died over the years. Habitat destruction is also a major cause as cutting down trees destroys the cockatoos’ nesting sites.

Black Cockatoos are also highly sought after as pets on the black market. Many chicks are taken from nests and trees are cut down to get at the eggs and babies inside the nesting hollows. This will destroy the nesting site as well.

It is illegal to shoot or poach Black Cockatoos.

At Perth Zoo: Perth Zoo has a number of cockatoo species on display in the Western Australian Native Cockatoo Species Exhibit, which is part of the Australian Bushwalk. The garden around the exhibit has been planted with cockatoo food trees to display the types of vegetation they eat.

Did you know? Forest Red-tailed Black Cockatoos make a ‘karrak karrak waa waa’ sound when calling.

Download the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Fact Sheet (pdf).

Hear the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo’s call: 

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